Artifice

Artifice, Metal Engraving, 7.25″x 9″, 2017 

Purchase work here – http://www.jehlers928.com/product/artifice

SCGI – Engraver’s Smack Down Notes

master ES Ars_moriendi_(Meister_E.S.),_L.181

Master ES

Andrea-Mantegna-Virgin-and-Child-2-

Mantegna

Durer

Durer

raimondi

Raimondi

Durer-vs-Raimondi

Raimondi

Goltius

Goltzius

claude mellan

Claude Mellan

Claude_Mellan_Face_of_Christdetail

Cronos-by-Stanley-William-Hayter

Hayter

Lasansky

Lasansky

Technique

 

Tape on the back of the plate for pivot.

The hand of the graver should fit into the palm of your hand. Fingers should not dip far below the blade.

Secure the plate you will engrave with your nondominant hand. Only the tips of your fingers should be pressed against the plate. Do not lay your hand flat against the plate. Doing so may result in injury if you slip.

Seat the tip of the blade into the metal. Aim for an approximate 10-degree angle. Slowly push. Try for thin, shallow lines as larger ones are much more challenging for people new to the process. Do a short series (about a cm in length) of lines off of the edge of the plate for practice.

If the tool is not moving and appears stuck in one spot on the plate, you are likely angling the tool too high. This will result in burrs being stuck in the plate. To avoid injury, you will need to get them out immediately. You can do so by scooping the burr out or cutting on the other side of the burr to pop it out. If that doesn’t work, use a scraper to pop it out.

If you are frequently slipping, your angle is too low, or the tool is not sharp. If the cut begins well and you begin to slip a few centimeters into the cut, you are likely moving the graver forward with your fingers/hand and not your entire arm. It is much easier to get a consistent angle with longer lines if you are moving your entire forearm and pushing the plate towards the graver. For curves, turn the plate and not your arm.

Supplies

EC Lyons – http://eclyons.com/

EC Lyons Bent Square Burin # 5, 6 or 7        cost –  9.29

Scraper

Sharpener (Burin) Roller                                 cost – 11.12

Sharpener (Crocker)                                        cost – 54.53

Stone India Flat Combo                                  cost – 16.99

Strop

3 in one oil                                                      cost – 3.00

or

GRS Tools

C-Max Burin Kit                                             cost – 49.00

Power Hone basic                                           cost – 561.00

1200 Grit (5 inch) Wheel                                cost  – 94.00

600 Grit (5 inch) Wheel                                  cost  – 94.00

260 Grit (5 inch) Wheel                                  cost  – 94.00

Dual Angle Sharpening Fixture                      cost – 286.00

or

Apex Dual Angle Fixture (round gravers)      cost – 265.00

Transfer Paper 

  • Reynolds Parchment Paper
  • The image need not be backward. Keep the image to a simple contour drawing.
  • Cut down to 8.5 x 11 and flatten out the sheet. It is possible to do this with a larger sheet, but it also increases the likely hood of a paper jam. If you have a larger image you want to transfer, I would suggest using multiple sheets of 8.5 x 11.
  • Place the flattened sheet in the auxiliary paper feed of a copier. It is important that the paper is very flat as it can cause a jam in the copier. I roll the sheet backward multiple times and store it flat in a book.
  • The toner will very lightly cling to the surface of the paper.

Image transferring and plate grounding options

  • Plasticine (modeling clay)
  • Make small rolls of tape and place on the back of the plate to adhere to the table.
  • Roll plasticine over the plate to create a light grease-like film. Keep this very lean, it does not take much.
  • Tape Parchment Paper with toner side down (packing tape works best) or Tracing paper with graphite side down over the plate.
  • Burnish back of the paper.
  • The toner on the parchment paper visibly comes off of the paper, making it much easier to know when you are finished. With tracing paper and graphite, you may need to periodically lift up the paper to see if it has transferred.
  • If you are using a toner transfer, you can heat set it to the plate with either a hot plate or a heat gun. Heat the surface for 30 seconds to a minute and let it cool down. Alcohol or polish will take off the toner.
  • If you are using a graphite transfer, it will smudge off fairly easily. Scribe with an etching needle all of your contours, so you have the image set into the plate.

 

  • Transfer solution – 1 Part Dammar Varnish: 9 Parts Isopropyl Alcohol

 

  • Make small rolls of tape and place on the back of the plate to adhere to the table.
  • Brush on the plate a very light layer of transfer solution. Keep this very lean, it does not take much. If you put too much on, the transfer will bleed and look unclear.
  • Tape Parchment Paper with toner side down (packing tape works best) or Tracing paper with graphite side down over the plate.
  • Burnish back of the paper.
  • The toner on the parchment paper visibly comes off of the paper, making it much easier to know when you are finished. With tracing paper and graphite, you may need to periodically lift up the paper to see if it has transferred.
  • The plate will be a little sticky, but will at least hold the line drawing much better than plasticine.

 

Sharpening 

Test if the tool is sharp by gently placing the tip of the tool in your thumbnail. If it sticks, you are ready to engrave!

  • Sharpening with a rolling jig
  • In the rolling jig, make sure that the set screw is even. Sometimes the screw can be dented from use. If it is not even, take the screw out and grind it across the stone to make it flat. Put the screw back in.
  • Clamp your graver in the top opening of the of the rolling jig with the blade sticking out about an inch. After doing so, place the rolling part of the jig on the stone and lean the graver face forward to touch the stone. If the graver does not lay flat on the stone, loosen the set screw and adjust the graver face to lay as flat as possible.
  • Put one drop of oil on the stone and roll over it with the jig only to move oil around.
  • Once the oil is distributed, place the face of the graver on the stone. Applying a little pressure, move both graver and rolling jig back and forth.
  • Finish off by stroking the face of the graver across a leather strop.

 

  • Sharpening with powerhone

 

  • Place graver in sharpening fixture face down. Adjust the geometry to read on the top section that is clamping the graver in. Adjust the geometry on the side to tilt it downward 45 degrees.
  • Place the side opening on through the magnetic rod on top of sharpening hone.
  • Place a 260 grit wheel on sharpening hone. Make sure it is flat.
  • Turn machine on and place the face of graver on the stone after the stone is spinning. Make sure that the tip of the graver is pointing in the direction that the wheel is spinning.
  • Repeat with 600 and 1200 wheel.
  • Finish off by stroking the face of the graver across a leather strop.

Winter break work…

I have a number of exchanges and big projects that will be due in the next six months. Over the winter break I have produced two new prints for exchanges. The image below is a part of the print exchange “First Contact” curated by Jessi Hardesty who is a professor at Carroll Community College in Westminster, Maryland. The theme focuses on sci-fi  and how this can used to create narratives involving social and political commentary.

The second image was created for “Imaging Utopia: Blueprints for Intent and Dissent” curated by Susanna Crum who is the printmaking professor at Indiana University Southeast. This work will be exhibited with the rest of the portfolio at SGCI in Las Vegas in April. https://www.eiseverywhere.com/ehome/sgci2018/484242/

Cross Disciplinary Approaches in Printmaking and Engraving

Peter Shoemaker BFA in Engraving and Sculpture 2013

Below: Work from Peter Shoemaker’s BFA exhibition “Infamy”.

Below: Hand Engraved syringes

Below: Hand Engraved Airplane Seatbelt

Below: Hand Engraved Nickel and Copper

Below: Hand Engraved Guillotine Blade (steel)

Melissa East BFA Engraving 2012

Below: Print from Hand Engraved High Impact Polystyrene

Below:Print from Hand Engraved High Impact Polystyrene 

Below: Melissa East performance at BFA thesis show.

Animated gifs from stop motion video.

Anneliese Narcisi, BFA Engraving 2012

Below: Resin casting from hand engraved steel plate.

Below: Hand Engraved Nickel and Brass, Monotype Blend Roll and Box.


Below: Found object (Drawer), Hand Engraved Copper, and Relief Engraved (High Impact Polystyrene) Prints.

Below: Found Object (Box), Monotype Blend Roll, Relief Engraved (High Impact Polystyrene) Prints.


 

Katrina Kinnan, BSE 2012

Below: Hand Engraving on Brass

Artifice

Artifice, Metal Engraving and Water Color, 7.25″ x 9″

Statement from The FL3TCH3R Exhibit: Socially & Politically Engaged Art catalogue

They all have an angle and it is spoken with embellishment to target the right spot. There’s demographics research on what kind of slop to feed. Hyperbole is an addiction and there’s a little bird that delivers a needle. The machine compounds paranoia and the lesson is to hate the unknown. Remember, they are the other. Remember, their mission in life is to ruin yours. Don’t change the lens you have. This is not unique to any social group. There is an absence in power with the need to belong. Rage comes from a glass that perpetually overflows – a metastasized hysteria industrial complex. A culture of toxic communication too busy to see who’s holding the coin purse. The American Dream is a Kincaid house in ruin. Pull the strings.